Gestational Diabetes – How Often Should I Check My Blood Sugars?

Gestational Diabetes – How Often Should I Check My Blood Sugars?

fingerstick diabetesYou know you have to check them, right?  I read a Facebook post yesterday where a woman wrote that she was afraid to check them.

Let’s think about that, shall we?  I mean, I am afraid of a lot of things.  Data is not one of them.  And, that is what you are gathering.

It might feel like a judgement against you, especially if you have not been following a healthy gestational diabetes meal plan.  If you have been snacking too much, or eating too big of portions.  But the damage is already done and you are already making it worse by ignoring it.  Sticking your head in the sand doesn’t make it any better.  Face up to it.

Ok, now that I have that off my chest, I want to talk about how often to check your blood sugars.

First of all, make sure you know what your doctor or dietitian wants you to do.  Best practice in the beginning when you are still learning – and if you have to take insulin – is 4 times a day.

When you wake up

One hour after you start eating breakfast

One hour after you start eating lunch

One hour after you start eating supper

*Any time you feel “funny” or different.

You need to check your blood sugar at least once a day after you are past the early stages and are well balanced.  If your doctor wants more – do it.  If you end up checking it once per day, vary the time that you check it so you get a good idea of where it’s at throughout the day.  Our bodies handle sugar and insulin different depending on a lot of things.  Best that you understand your body, because it’s different than other pregnant and gestational diabetic women.

In the morning, you may have what is called a “dawn phenomenon“.

Basically,it’s that your blood sugar is higher than normal because your body (in the middle of the night) gets a little low on blood sugar so it reacts by making more blood sugar.  Add that to the fact that you may be low on insulin, and it’s going to be a little elevated.  Many women counter this by eating a little larger evening snack and making sure it has a combination of protein and carbohydrate.  That way it takes longer to digest, and gives your body carbohydrate throughout the night.  It’s not a good idea to counter the higher blood sugars by skipping a bedtime snack.

Most women are taught to measure their blood sugars about one hour after they start eating, also known as “post prandial”.  This is the time when your blood sugar is likely to have peaked and should be below 140 mg/dl.  If it’s higher than that, look at the meal and see where the carbohydrate is lurking.  Earlier this week I wrote about a gestational diabetes meal plan for a week, and I know it’s hard to understand that a lot of foods have carbohydrate in them.

Ask your doctor how you should treat your blood sugar numbers – the answer may be that it depends…  Either way, you have to check them.  Not checking them is putting your baby at higher risk, and you as well.  It’s just information that you can use to make a decision about how to treat your blood sugar levels.  That’s it, that’s all, and you need to track them throughout the day.

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Gestational Diabetes Treatment: What Are The Guidelines? Part 1

Now that you have been diagnosed with gestational diabetes based on the glucose tolerance test, what should you do?

Your gestational diabetes treatment is based on clinical guidelines that tell your obstetrician how to manage your blood sugars and keep you as healthy as possible!

The treatment uses 3 different types of controls to get your blood sugars where they need to be for your health and the safety of your baby.

When managing your treatment of gestational diabetes, some interventions are more complicated than others.  Most doctors typically start with trying to control your blood sugars using a diet and exercise plan that can keep your blood sugars under control most of the time.  Never forget, your pregnant body is full of hormones, and sometimes it does not react the way that would be expected.  During the management of gestational diabetes, what is of the utmost importance is the health of the baby and mom, not necessarily if you have to take medication or not.  It’s a short time that you will need to tightly manage your eating and blood sugars, so grin and bear it!

Most gestational diabetes treatment starts with dietary control.  It’s important that a mom be provided with some nutritional guidelines that are individualized based on what she needs.  If she is a vegetarian, the meal plan that is provided by the professional should reflect ways to get the needed protein, carbohydrate and fat without the animal proteins that mom has chosen to avoid.  Most moms see either a certified diabetes educator (nurse or dietitian) or a registered dietitian who can provide them with calorie levels and guidance about what foods to eat and how much.  Many women may find this to be enough information and be able to successfully navigate the foods that they need to eat and grow a healthy baby.  Sometimes, more information is needed, and some women may choose to purchase a gestational diabetes meal plan that can help them understand all of their options.  Either way, mom will start with eating the right amounts of carbohydrate at meals.

Often, pregnant women with diabetes find that their blood sugar is affected by foods in different ways.  Sometimes, a fruit can cause a spike in blood sugars, while other foods such as ice cream seem to allow for a smooth transition without a blood sugar spike.  It is important to track what you eat, how much and when as well as you check your blood sugars.  This will help you and your doctor understand what parts of the day and what foods are most affecting you.  It’s going to be different for every woman, as our bodies have different responses to hormones that are peaking during pregnancy.

How many calories should you eat for your gestational diabetes treatment plan?

For women who are not over weight before pregnancy, it is recommended to eat 30 calories/kg/day.  1 kilogram = 2.2 pounds, so divide your weight in pounds by 2.2, then take that number and multiply by 30.  For example, if you weighed 150 pounds that is 68.18 kilograms.  So you would estimate your calorie needs at about 2045 per day.  Women who are over weight should multiply by 25 calories/kg/day.  As long as your baby is growing and your blood sugars are under control, you should be okay with the amount of food you are eating during your gestational diabetes treatment.

The next step that many doctors also recommend in combination with diet control is exercise.  While you probably were exercising during your pregnancy, exercise in small bursts throughout the day can help a mom control her blood sugars well.  After every meal, it will be important to take a 15 minute walk at a quick pace to lower your blood sugar. Exercise causes your body to use the sugar in your blood more effectively, and you can decrease your spike by adding in a burst of exercise a few times a day.  This also gives you health benefits by controlling the weight gain and improving your aerobic capacity.  That will come in handy during labor.  Check with your doctor if you are concerned about exercise, but it’s one of the best ways to lower blood sugar without using insulin.

In our next post we will talk about the medications that are used to manage gestational diabetes treatment and how they work.

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